12/28/12

wide open spaces

I left San Antonio overdressed with a wool sweater over a t-shirt and no sooner than I was on the highway I became overheated. With weather so warm I did what any New Yorker hungry for sun would and rolled down the windows, pulled on the shades and cranked up the radio to join the myriad of cars on Interstate 35N. In 90 minutes I would be in Driftwood, home to the infamous BBQ joint Salt Lick--which lived up to its notoriety and fame with finger-lickin' ribs and meat that dropped off the bone. After seeing the crowds at the table, I cautiously ordered small with Jacob the waiter who visited NYC once in honor of the fallen born on his birthday: 9/11. Small means nothing in the land of wide open spaces and I did my best to damage the 1/4 lb pork ribs, 1/4 lb brisket, 1/2 pint of potato salad, jalapeno and iced tea. (Oddly this is the 2nd time I've ordered iced team only to be told its unsweetened, I wonder if sweet tea is strictly a Southeastern commodity.)


Google Maps took me off I-35 and on the road less traveled where at times I was the only car on the highways interlaced roadways denoted by the RM/FM + #'s.  A majestic blue sky clear as anything I've ever seen was the backdrop for horse ranches, cattle ranches and mile long driveways that led to who knows what with their wheat-colored fields with grazing farm animals, straight out of cult classics Giant and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. 

The drive was relaxing, peaceful even, the sun shining, just me and my ride (actually Kim's car again, a BMW something or another that feels like a sports car compared to my Santa Fe); almost like Jack Kerouac On the Road. Signs were infrequent and not as I expected, for along with the green and white markers for Bear Creek Hollow and Slaughter Lane (which by the way is the shortest stoplight ever, with just enough time for one car to cross and wish you godspeed), I also encountered unique ones for The Wizard Academy and a Hindu Temple (near Trinity Crossing), reminders that though I may be far from my city but the melting pot has runneth over across all state lines.  


Post a Comment